ATTRACTIONS

Lassen Volcanic National Park

The home to steaming fumaroles, meadows freckled with wildflowers, clear mountain lakes, and numerous volcanoes. Jagged peaks tell the story of its eruptive past while hot water continues to shape the land. Lassen Volcanic offers opportunities to discover the wonder and mysteries of volcanoes and hot water for visitors willing to explore the undiscovered. It’s rich in hydrothermal sites like Bumpass Hell, with its acres of bubbling mud pots. The summit of Lassen Peak Volcano offers views over the surrounding wilderness. Nearby, the Devastated Area is littered with lava rocks from its last eruption. A network of trails through forest and around several lakes connects with the Pacific Crest Trail in the north.

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McArthur-Burney Falls

The centerpiece of McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park is 129-foot Burney Falls, which is not the highest waterfall in the state, but possibly the most beautiful. The waterfall, which is fed by underground springs and flows at 100 million gallons every day, can be enjoyed from above at lookout point. But for a more refreshing perspective, take the trail to the pool at the base of the falls and along the stream. The park features several hiking trails along the creek and through the park’s evergreen forest. The park’s landscape was created by volcanic activity as well as erosion from weather and streams and is covered by black volcanic rock, or basalt. Burney Creek, which is created by the parks underground springs flows to Lake Britton after Burney Falls. Lake Britton is an excellent family friendly lake with boat rentals, kayaking, and paddle boarding.

Subway Cave

Subway Cave is a lava tube that was formed during volcanic events just twenty thousand years ago, but today it offers an unusual hiking experience in an area of very interesting and recent geologic activity. The trailhead is located less than half a mile from the junction of Highway 89 and Highway 44 in Old Station. Subway Cave was created when large amounts of lava were flowing across all the area around the present-day location of Hat Creek. The lava on top, exposed to the air, cooled and formed a hard cap while molten lava continued to flow beneath. Eventually, the molten lava drained away but the hollow tubes remained. This hike lets you follow in the footsteps of these relatively recent lava flows.

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Cinder Cone

Cinder Cone is a cinder cone volcano in Lassen Volcanic National Park in northern California. It is located about 10 miles northeast of Lassen Peak and provides an excellent view of Brokeoff Mountain, Lassen Peak, and Chaos Crags. Cinder cones are scattered all around, but none are more spectacular than the Cinder Cone that created the Fantastic Lava Beds and the colorful Painted Dunes eleven miles north east of Lassen Peak. Cinder Cone Trail is a 4 mile heavily trafficked loop trail located near Old Station town, that features a lake and is rated as difficult. The trail is primarily used for hiking and is best used from May until October.

Whiskeytown Lake

A reservoir in Shasta County in northwestern California, about 8 miles west of Redding. It’s warm, crystal-clear waters lure swimmers, kayakers, and anglers to escape the summer heat, and is perhaps the most recognized feature of the park. However, water-based recreation is only a part of what the 42,000-acre Whiskeytown National Recreation Area has to offer. Visit waterfalls, hike through rugged mountains, explore California Gold Rush history, and observe post-fire ecology in action.

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Lake Shasta Caverns

Located in Lakehead, California (near Redding, CA) on the McCloud arm of Lake Shasta. The caverns were created over 250 million years ago by flowing water. Over the years this water drained leaving the caverns seen today. The caves are made entirely of limestone and feature a wide variety of formations, including stalactites, stalagmites, soda straws, columns, and flowstone. The Lake Shasta Caverns currently attract thousands of visitors every year. The only transportation to the caverns from the visitor center is a short ride on a catamaran across Shasta Lake, followed by a scenic bus ride up a steep mountain grade.

The Sundial Bridge

The Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay is a cantilever spar cable-stayed bridge for bicycles and pedestrians that spans the Sacramento River in Redding, CA and forms a large sundial. The Sundial Bridge provides pedestrian access to the north and south areas of Turtle Bay Exploration Park, a complex containing environmental, art and history museums and the McConnell Arboretum and Gardens. It also forms the gateway to the Sacramento River Trail, a 35-mile-long trail that extends along both sides of the river and connects the bridge to the Shasta Dam.

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